Daffodil - Mavis Manor MMX2 Collection

Flower in Full Bloom


   Since we had a very mild winter, Daffodil Season came early this year. It was still as magnificent as ever. All the daffodils that I have grown are either plants that were already on the grounds that I simple moved to a different flower bed, plants I've been given over the past few years, or rescued from old and forgotten homestead, some deep in the woods. 
   I never knew a lot about Daffodils until this year when a guest told me about the American Daffodil Society, below is the types and colours of Daffodils out there in the world. 
   This fall I plan to do some Daffodil trading. If you have any you'd like to trade, message me, via facebook,
twitter or email.

The American Daffodil Society - ADS

The divisions are:
Division 1: Trumpet Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin. Corona length is equal to or exceeds the length of the perianth segments, flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 2: Large-cupped Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin. Corona length, or corona radius if flattened, is more than 1/3 but less than equal to the length of the perianth segments; flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 3: Small-cupped Daffodils. Corona length, or corona radius if flattened, is no more than 1/3 the length of the perianth segments; flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 4: Double Daffodils. Any daffodil in which more than one layer of perianth segments and/or more than one layer of corona segments are present. The combination of doubled perianth and corona segments can vary widely between cultivars, and there may be one or more flowers per stem, also varying by cultivar.

Division 5: Triandrus Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus triandrus and its allies clearly evident; flowers hang more or less downward, perianth segments are often reflexed, and plants most often bear two or more flowers per stem.

Division 6: Cyclamineus Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus cyclamineus and its allies clearly evident; perianth segments are often reflexed or wind-swept in appearance, corona length varies but can sometimes exceed the perianth segment length, and flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 7: Jonquilla Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus jonquilla and its allies clearly evident; flowers are small to medium sized, perianth segments are flat, corona length varies but is usually short and semi-spherical, foliage may be rush-like and dark green as in the species but phenotypic distillation through crossbreeding between divisions has produced a range of foliage types. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers may be borne one to several to a stem, depending upon cultivar.

Division 8: Tazetta (Poetaz or Bunch-flowered) Daffodils. Characteristics may be intermediate between Narcissus tazetta and its allies and/or N. tazetta in combination with Narcissus poeticus is ambiguously evident. Perianth segments are flat, corona length is usually short and semi-spherical. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers may be borne in clusters of a few to over a dozen per stem, depending upon cultivar.

Division 9: Poeticus (Poet's) Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus poeticus and its allies clearly evident; flowers are medium sized, perianth segments are flat and nearly always white, corona is small, flat, and wrinkled—usually green eyed and orange-to-red banded—often with intermediate shades of yellow. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers are usually borne one, but very occasionally two, to a stem.

Division 10: Bulbocodium Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus bulbocodium and its allies clearly evident; flowers are small, perianth segments are small, linear to awl-shaped, corona is very large in proportion to the perianth and "hoop petticoat" or bowl shaped, foliage is usually rush-like and dark green as in the species. Flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 11: Split-corona (Split cup, Butterfly) Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin and can represent any potential genetic background. The corona, which can be any length or orientation, is radially split from the outer rim inward at more than half its natural length. The splitting can occur triradially or hexiradially, and in some cases the segments may be broad enough to underlap and overlap alternating perianth segments. Though flowers are most often borne one to a stem, there are cultivars with multiple flowers per stem. Division 11 is subdivided as follows:
a) Collar Daffodils. Corona segments lie opposite the perianth segments and are usually in two whorls of three, giving a frilly apparance
b) Papillon Daffodils. Corona segments lie alternate to the perianth segments and are usually in a single whorl of six, the cup being flatter and more open. These often have a sunburst streaked color pattern.

Division 12: Miscellaneous Daffodils. Any daffodils of garden origin not classifiable by the first 11 Divisions. They may be inter-division hybrids, or of such ambiguous heritage or phenotype that they do not easily fit into any of the above divisions. This includes the dwarf daffodil "Tete-a-Tete".

Division 13: Species, Wild Variants and Wild Hybrids. All Daffodils occurring naturally in the wild. Plants of the preceding 12 divisions are all of garden origin.
Miniature Daffodils - Miniature Daffodils are not an official ADS Division; miniatures can occur in each of the other 13 Divisions and possess the same descriptive characteristics. However, the flowers are 1.5 in (38 mm) or less in diameter, and ideally are borne on proportionally smaller plants.

Colour Range
W = White or whitish
G = Green
Y = Yellow
P = Pink
O = Orange
R = Red

Mavis Manor 2012 Gallery


4 W-Y "Mavis's Dress"

1 Y-YO

1 W-YW "Flat Top White"

2 Y-YO

2 W-YO

1 Y Y "Charlie's House Bloom"

2 W-Y

3 Y-GYR "Firefly 5"











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