31 March 2016

Daffodil - Mavis Manor MMx6 Collection

Welcome to the fifth year of us Iding our Daffodils. In 2012, the daffodils were all up and blooming on the 31 March, in 2013 our first ones came up the 11 April, - 25 April. In 2014, 11-20 of April was the aveage bloom. In 2015, 7th thru 20th of April. This year 2016, they started to bloom around the 25th of March, with many more to come. As of the 31st 75% have bloomed. Below is a description of Daffodils, and then the 2016 Mavis Manor Collection.
Flower in Full Bloom

Mavis Manor c. 1897


Since we had a very mild winter, Daffodil Season came early this year. It was still as magnificent as ever. All the daffodils that I have grown are either plants that were already on the grounds that I simple moved to a different flower bed, plants I've been given over the past few years, or rescued from old and forgotten homestead, some deep in the woods.


This fall I plan to do some Daffodil trading. If you have any you'd like to trade, message me, via facebook, twitter or email.

The American Daffodil Society - ADS

The divisions are: Division 1: Trumpet Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin. Corona length is equal to or exceeds the length of the perianth segments, flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 2: Large-cupped Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin. Corona length, or corona radius if flattened, is more than 1/3 but less than equal to the length of the perianth segments; flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 3: Small-cupped Daffodils. Corona length, or corona radius if flattened, is no more than 1/3 the length of the perianth segments; flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 4: Double Daffodils. Any daffodil in which more than one layer of perianth segments and/or more than one layer of corona segments are present. The combination of doubled perianth and corona segments can vary widely between cultivars, and there may be one or more flowers per stem, also varying by cultivar.

Division 5: Triandrus Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus triandrus and its allies clearly evident; flowers hang more or less downward, perianth segments are often reflexed, and plants most often bear two or more flowers per stem.

Division 6: Cyclamineus Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus cyclamineus and its allies clearly evident; perianth segments are often reflexed or wind-swept in appearance, corona length varies but can sometimes exceed the perianth segment length, and flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 7: Jonquilla Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus jonquilla and its allies clearly evident; flowers are small to medium sized, perianth segments are flat, corona length varies but is usually short and semi-spherical, foliage may be rush-like and dark green as in the species but phenotypic distillation through crossbreeding between divisions has produced a range of foliage types. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers may be borne one to several to a stem, depending upon cultivar.

Division 8: Tazetta (Poetaz or Bunch-flowered) Daffodils. Characteristics may be intermediate between Narcissus tazetta and its allies and/or N. tazetta in combination with Narcissus poeticus is ambiguously evident. Perianth segments are flat, corona length is usually short and semi-spherical. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers may be borne in clusters of a few to over a dozen per stem, depending upon cultivar.

Division 9: Poeticus (Poet's) Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus poeticus and its allies clearly evident; flowers are medium sized, perianth segments are flat and nearly always white, corona is small, flat, and wrinkled—usually green eyed and orange-to-red banded—often with intermediate shades of yellow. Fragrance is usually prominent. Flowers are usually borne one, but very occasionally two, to a stem.

Division 10: Bulbocodium Daffodils. Characteristics of Narcissus bulbocodium and its allies clearly evident; flowers are small, perianth segments are small, linear to awl-shaped, corona is very large in proportion to the perianth and "hoop petticoat" or bowl shaped, foliage is usually rush-like and dark green as in the species. Flowers are borne one to a stem.

Division 11: Split-corona (Split cup, Butterfly) Daffodils. Plants are of garden origin and can represent any potential genetic background. The corona, which can be any length or orientation, is radially split from the outer rim inward at more than half its natural length. The splitting can occur triradially or hexiradially, and in some cases the segments may be broad enough to underlap and overlap alternating perianth segments. Though flowers are most often borne one to a stem, there are cultivars with multiple flowers per stem. Division 11 is subdivided as follows: a) Collar Daffodils. Corona segments lie opposite the perianth segments and are usually in two whorls of three, giving a frilly apparance b) Papillon Daffodils. Corona segments lie alternate to the perianth segments and are usually in a single whorl of six, the cup being flatter and more open. These often have a sunburst streaked color pattern.

Division 12: Miscellaneous Daffodils. Any daffodils of garden origin not classifiable by the first 11 Divisions. They may be inter-division hybrids, or of such ambiguous heritage or phenotype that they do not easily fit into any of the above divisions. This includes the dwarf daffodil "Tete-a-Tete".

Division 13: Species, Wild Variants and Wild Hybrids. All Daffodils occurring naturally in the wild. Plants of the preceding 12 divisions are all of garden origin. Miniature Daffodils - Miniature Daffodils are not an official ADS Division; miniatures can occur in each of the other 13 Divisions and possess the same descriptive characteristics. However, the flowers are 1.5 in (38 mm) or less in diameter, and ideally are borne on proportionally smaller plants.

Colour Range
W = White or whitish
G = Green
Y = Yellow
P = Pink
O = Orange
R = Red


a: 1 Y -Y "Charlie's House Bloom" 




b: 1 YW - Y 












c: 2 W - Y
d: 2 W - RO

e: 1 WY - YO

f: 4 WY-Y (New for 2016)
g: 1 Y-OY
h: 4 GY-Y

I: 1 W-Y

07 February 2016

The Cereal Bowl Series - Sally

Why did Sally sell seashells by the seashore?

For way to long the great people of this world have been wondering this very question, tonight my friends it’s time for it to be answered!


So, go pour you’re self a large bowl of cereal, and come back for this grand story.

The story begins a long time ago, in an age when things were simple. A time most of us have forgotten, or at least a time most of us can’t remember anymore. This is mainly due to the endless 24 hour TV. I know, I know who I’m I to dis TV. This magical box of lights and sounds. Ahh.. Just try to walk past a TV and not look, just try. But, this not the part of the story I want to get into tonight, we will save that story for another bowl of cereal.

Sally being a smart girl, who loved the seashore understood, that a lot of kids weren’t allowed to play near the ocean, their land loving parent thought in the olden days that Shark were dangerous creature that could come ashore and eat you. And eat you dead. Galeophobia is what it’s called in the smart college geeky kid circles!

“Martin, it's all psychological. You yell barracuda, everybody says, "Huh? What?" You yell shark, we've got a panic on our hands on the Fourth of July.”

Sally being the smart girl she was understood that the Man eating sharks were just something Hollywood made up to keep people from visiting the FREE ocean, and convinced people to visit resort towns where they could swim in SAFE, not free swimming pools. This made Sally rather sad. Sally loved the salty breeze, the feeling of sand in her toes, and the colour outfits the older female children wore to impress the older boy children. She didn’t always enjoy the weird shaped balloons next to the whiskey bottle she collected for her ocean samples thou,



One day, a cold brisk day, in late March, Sally had a great idea to collect shell, sell them for a shiny coin, and let the children of the world take home a piece of her magical wonderland. This is when Sally started selling seashell by the seashore.



Sally is now a multi billionaire living in a tropical island, escape the corporate greed of the ocean front shop who sell you over price crappy seashell that they import from china, but the bastards are to lazy to walk out the back of their shops and collect the FREE one that wash up on the beach.

Damn you corporate lazy fascist pigs!

31 January 2016

The Cereal Bowl Series - The Farm

My Farm - The Cereal Farm





Today is a great day, it's Pre Cereal Day! Before you can enjoy your lovely bowl of Cereal, you must first grow that lovely goodness. That is where I come in. I now can grow my own pure pre cereal goodness!
"I need somebody willing to sit up all night with a newborn colt. And watch it die. Then dry his eyes and say, 'Maybe next year.' I need somebody who can shape an ax handle from a persimmon sprout, shoe a horse with a hunk of car tire, who can make harness out of haywire, feed sacks and shoe scraps. And who, planting time and harvest season, will finish his forty-hour week by Tuesday noon, then, pain'n from 'tractor back,' put in another seventy-two hours."


I thought since I lost my bid for congress of West Virginia I should still do something great! This is my hopes for greatness. Farming, the last greatness. Lets make the future Generation Great Farmers!
Somebody willing to ride the ruts at double speed to get the hay in ahead of the rain clouds and yet stop in mid-field and race to help when he sees the first smoke from a neighbor's place.

"Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." -Dwight D. Eisenhower

"A great figure or physique is nice, but it's self-confidence that makes someone really sexy."
 Somebody who will stop his mower for an hour to splint the broken leg of a meadow lark. It had to be somebody who'd plow deep and straight and not cut corners. Somebody to seed, weed, feed, breed and rake and disc and plow and plant and tie the fleece and strain the milk and replenish the self-feeder and finish a hard week's work with a five-mile drive to church